Jun 142012
 

When the “war on poverty” first began after the Second World War the intentions of those involved were said to have been good. But since all of the data collected since then has quite clearly demonstrated that every single intervention by government to combat poverty has created more poor, more illegitimate children, more ghettos, more unemployment, and more crime, one can only conclude that the efforts of today’s politicians to combat poverty are not based on good intentions.  Their welfare schemes and wealth redistribution efforts can only be described as willful, deliberate, methodical, cold-hearted, immoral, and evil. In the face of overwhelming evidence that social welfare programs, minimum wage laws, regulations, licenses, biases in favour of closed union shops, and social housing ghettos have had the exact opposite consequences than those they have purported it is abundantly clear that the politicians have ulterior motives.

As an example let’s look at Regent Park in Toronto, the home to the gang members involved in the recent Eaton Centre murders. This project was built in the 1940s as a government social housing experiment and at 69 acres is the largest of its kind in the country. It involved the demolishing of the center of the neighborhood called Cabbagetown and the erecting of cookie cutter apartment complexes where the poor could pay whatever they were able. It is currently run by Toronto Community Housing and has become an enclave of economic refugees who are corralled together in what has become a ghetto of crime and poverty where the residents have very little hope of ever getting out.

One of the inherent problems of concentrating the poor together is that when everyone you know is poor; your friends, classmates, neighbours, friends of friends there are no role models to emulate to get out of poverty. There is no one to teach them the personal habits necessary to prosper.  If all you know is poverty then that is all you can come to expect.  The result is despair.

This government-created problem can be solved by allowing the tenants of these apartments to buy their units outright. Home ownership leads to pride of ownership. It allows them to have equity and capital which can then be leveraged to their economic advantage.

It should not go unnoticed that the representative politicians for Regent Park are from the extreme left of the political spectrum. Locally there is Pam McConnell of the NDP, provincially Glen Murray of the McGuinty Liberals, and federally Bob Rae – one time NDP Premier of the province and now the interim leader of the federal Liberals – is the MP for the area. . It should be obvious that they have no intention in doing anything to correct the problem of Regent Park. It can also be easily surmised that these politicians need this society of victims to hold up as motive for their wealth redistribution schemes.

Let’s leave Regent Park and look at the broader picture of growing up in today’s world where many of the adults in positions of responsibility over children have either immoral or amoral ideas about how one should live their lives.

This week we saw the speech of David McCullough, Jr. at the commencement ceremonies of Wellesley High School in Massachusetts go viral and hit the media talk shows. The speech admonished the graduates for being coddled by their parents and too self-centred. Not one pundit had anything bad to say about the speech. Even though, to me the speech is a prime example of what not to say to any child.

These are Mr. McConnell’s closing remarks:

“Exercise free will and creative independent thought not for the satisfactions they will bring you but for the good they will do others, the rest of the 6.8 billion and those who will follow them, and then you too will discover the great and curious truth of the human experience is that selflessness is the best thing you can do for yourself.”

Not one radio pundit could correctly identify that it is this instruction to sacrifice yourself to the service of others which is at the root cause of all of our problems, all of them.  Altruism is the belief that your life is not your own and that you should devote it to the service of others.  This goes against the very nature of an individual human being who knows with every fiber of that being that his life is his own and that no one else has claim to it.

But the philosophy of altruism is drilled into children today from their parents, teachers, politicians, and from the pulpit. With such positively revolting guidance it is no wonder that youth of today despair.

(Originally broadcast on Just Right #254, June 14, 2012)

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